Farm School-Bees and Weaving

By Jenna Richter | May 13, 2016 | Arts, Farming, Project Work, Sustainablility

We were so excited to be back at Green Bow Farm today for Farm School.  Every time we visit, we are learning, exploring and experiencing a small bite of what Green Bow farm is and does.  There is never a visit without surprises.  Today, we started out looking at a nest of robins!

 

Farmer Christina lifted child after child to peek at the tiny bird who were a cross between the beauty of their potential and tiny and helpless.
Farmer Christina lifted child after child to peek at the tiny birds who were a cross between the beauty of their potential and tiny and helpless.

 

Next Farmer Matt explained the way the hives were set up, the bees transported and the tools used in beekeeping.

 

Smoke masks these pheromones and confuses the bees. This allows the beekeeper to work in the hive and keeps the bees calm.
Smoke masks the pheromones bees use to communicate and confuses the bees. This allows the beekeeper to work in the hive and keeps the bees calm.

 

Next, Farmer Christina showed us the parts of an inactive hive so we could learn about how everything was put together inside.  We looked at the brood chamber and frames.

 

This frame is free of honey and able to be touched.
This frame is free of honey and able to be touched.

 

Next our beekeepers Matt and Tosha, suit up and investigate the health and progress of the bees in the hive using the smoker to calm the bees.

 

They aren't called busy bees for nothing!
They aren’t called busy bees for nothing!

 

Up close we could see the larva and pupa that had been covered over to protect them as well as many adult bees.

Inside the open holes we could see the white larva.
Inside the open holes we could see the white larva.

 

We strung our loom that we created on our last visit and then took a walk around the pastures observing that every animal had rotated and was in a new environment.  We were in collecting mode, with paper bags in hand, ready to find beauty to add to our loom.  Feathers, flowers, fleece, sticks, bark, grasses and bits of bailing twine and rope filled our bags as we walked.

Back at the loom we worked our raw materials as a illustration of the diverstity of the farm through the loom strings.

 

Emmett tall enough and with long arms weaving the highest parts.
Emmett tall enough and with long arms weaving the highest parts.

 

This loom is a work in progress, we will continue to collect and weave on it during our next and final visit of the year in a few weeks.

 

Louie, Audrey, Boden and Emmett and Harlow at the loom.
Louie, Audrey, Boden and Emmett and Harlow at the loom.